Marlene Dietrich was both lesbian and heterosexual

Marlene Dietrich was both lesbian and heterosexual

lesbian sex

       Marlene Dietrich was born on December 27, 1901, in Berlin. Her father served in the police, and her mother was from a family of merchants. As a child, Dietrich called herself Paul, hoping that she looked more like her father than her mother. At the age of sixteen, she made her debut as a cellist at the Red Cross Carnival. In 1918 she graduated from the Augusta-Victoria School for Girls and the following year entered the Weimar Conservatory in cello. A wrist injury buried her hopes for a music career. She returned to Berlin, where she began studying at the Max Reinhart Drama School. Her first film was Little Napoleon (1923). The following year, she married Rudolf Scheiber, and they had a daughter. It was her husband who first suggested that Marlene wear men's clothing and a monocle during performances. During one of these stage shows, her partner Claire Waldorf involved her in lesbian sex. In addition, she is credited with teaching Marlene to sing beautifully without having real vocal data.

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      Fortunately, Marlene was spotted by Austrian producer Joseph von Sternberg, who offered her the role of Lola-Lola, the cabaret singer in Blue Angel (1930). The critical success of the film; greatly strengthened the reputation of both. They both went to the United States, where they shot together a series of remarkable films: Morocco (1930), Dishonored (1931), Blonde Venus (1932), Shanghai Express (1932), Bloody Empress ( 1934). Sternberg carefully cultivated Marlene's masculine appearance. As he wrote: “I saw her wearing a man's suit, a high hat and similar things back in Berlin, and this is how I showed her (in the film“ Morocco ”). She wore menswear with great charm, and not only did I want to touch her sexual landmarks lightly, but also to demonstrate that her sensual appeal is due not only to the structure of her legs. ”


Legs Marlene Dietrich ... Once she spoke about them: “My legs, always my legs. For me, they serve only one purpose - they allow me to walk. " However, they were worth millions of dollars.

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      When Hitler came to power, the Nazis asked Dietrich to return to Germany and continue his career at home. There were rumors that Hitler had offered her to be his mistress. She objected, however, insisting that she would return to her homeland only if Sternberg, who was a Jew, was allowed to return with her to Germany, and in the future, he would continue to be the producer of her films.


The last film directed by Sternberg and Dietrich together was The Devil Is a Woman (1935). It became such a commercial collapse that Dietrich was called "a ticket office with hell." The next was Destry Rides Again, filmed only in 1939. During World War II, Marlene supported the movement of the Resistance groups in France, Italy, and the United States. In addition, she established an anti-fascist radio broadcast in Germany. For this, she was awarded the American Medal for Freedom.

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        After the war, she starred in films such as Fear of the Stage (1950), Rancho Notorius (1952), Witness for the Prosecution (1957), Touch of Evil (1958), Nuremberg Trials (1961) ... None of these films had anything to do with the ones they shot with Sternberg in the thirties. Her last film was Just a Gigolo (1979). Since the 1950s, Dietrich has appeared in numerous successful musicals and The One Woman Show on Broadway.

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      Although she never divorced her husband, they lived most of their lives apart, and Dietrich's numerous novels were known, with both men and women, among which one can mention the Hollywood screenwriter Mercedes de Acosta (whose romance with Greta Garbo at one time very sensational), and the singer Edith Piaf.

On her travels, seventy-three-year-old Marley Dietrich was accompanied by twenty-year-old Canadian Jinette Wahon. Marlene spent her last years in Paris, where she died on May 6, 1992.

lesbian sex

       Critic Kenneth Tynan explained Marlene Dietrich's appeal this way: “She had sex but was not gender-specific,” mentioning that she was “the only woman allowed to attend the annual ball for male transvestites in pre-Hitler Berlin. She habitually changed into a high hat, white tie, and tailcoat.

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    Once she saw two extravagant creatures, dressed in provocative shiny dresses and blond wigs, descend the main staircase, she, widening her eyes in surprise, asked: "Do you love each other?" "Fraulein," one of them answered coldly, "we are not lesbians!" Marlene does not live in the sexual world of men, but also it is not in the world of women. She is outwardly very sexy but lacks the depth of inner sensation. All her art is in the game of sexuality. Visibility is an image, and an image is a call. For every man, she is a lover and mother, for every woman - a beloved and aunt, and no one is a husband except Rudy, but he is her husband, who lives far away on a ranch in California. "

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      Marlene Dietrich's merit is that she introduced the American audience to the continental tradition known as the "garcon": the mischievous boy (girl) that flooded Paris and Berlin in the twenties and thirties. Her well-known white tie, tailcoat, and high hat are often adopted, and to this day such different theater and film actors as Liza Minnelli, Julie Andrews, Annie Lennox. Indeed, her deliberate masculinity is full of charm, she has become an integral part of our culture.

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      Marlene Dietrich has always been much more than just a "star", more than an actress and singer - from the very beginning of her career she was an icon, a person who guided and set the tone in style and fashion, and even more - she was a cultural symbol. A symbol that, since the early 1920s, has been the standard of beauty and charm, an implacable opponent of fascism, a preacher of sexual freedom. Perhaps, in the latter, only Madonna can compare with her, a new legend of modernity, replacing Marlene, also proudly carrying the banner of emancipation.

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     Marlene Dietrich was both lesbian and heterosexual, and masculine and feminine. She was called "the most stylish man in Hollywood", her extraordinary beauty was equally worried about men and women, gays and lesbians. She so boldly violated the boundaries of the sexes, as no star before her, and very few after. In 1928, when she was already well known in Germany, Marlene was given a resounding reception after a successful lesbian duet with Margot Lyon in the film "Es liegt in der Luft" ("It`s in the Air"). Two years later, in her film debut in the United States, in the film Morocco, she plays the role of an independent American woman who never, under any circumstances, wears dresses, smokes a cigarette, and kisses women left and right. This film was a global cultural breakthrough for Marlene, the first triumph, imprinted on the brains of the public for many decades. And for many decades for Marlene, the image of a dashing androgyne strengthened, which she easily dispelled at every opportunity.


The name Dietrich can also be associated with the relaxation in the public consciousness regarding homosexuality in the United States - it is she, light and airy, charming and seductive, accustomed to freedom in Germany in the 1920s, brought tolerance towards gays and lesbians to America. The image of a woman-man for a long time racked the minds of viewers and cinema screens - "Dishonored" in 1931, "Shanghai Express" in the 32nd, films first tried on Marlene, and then on many other women - the male military shape. What are the scenes from the lesbian club in "Blonde Venus" in 1932, where Marlene, dressed in a man's white tailcoat and top hat flirts with a cabaret girl and sings her famous song "I Couldn`t Be Annoyed"! Another picture, where Marlene is completely surrendered to the power of passion for men's outfits, - "The Scarlet Empress" (1934), where she famously flaunts in the attire of Russian Cossacks. In 1940, in the film "Seven Sinners", Marlene Dietrich changes into a naval uniform.

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    But it would be naive to think that all experiments with menswear Marlene put only in the movies - men's pants were a favorite part of her everyday wardrobe. Throughout the thirties, at all public events, the actress invariably appeared in trousers. It is thanks to Marlene Dietrich that women have the right to this “not feminine” part of the toilet, in the opinion of men. Note that men did not have a handsome revolutionary who just as successfully won a skirt from women in favor of a man's wardrobe. It's a pity.


In addition to her passion for trousers, Marlene had another passion - a sultry Spaniard, screenwriter Mercedes de Acosta, with whom she had a very tender relationship. It was because of this relationship that the Paramount film company did not want to work with Dietrich, as they put it for "ethical reasons", and this despite the fact that the actress's "lesbian" image was rather into their hands, as they would say now "profitable PR move ". Even then, lesbians were in vogue. But even then, lesbians were denied work.


It is known that Mercedes de Acosta was not the first "lady of the heart" Dietrich, even as a teenager (1913) Marlene was in love with her French teacher Mademoiselle Bregaund, of course - platonically. However, already in the 20s, the actress has firmly established the reputation of a woman who is equally interested in both men and women.

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     Androgyny was an important part of Marlene Dietrich's image, so, for example, in the 50s, she first began to sing songs dedicated to women on a male person: "One For My Baby (And One More For the Road)", "Iґve Grown Accustomed to Her Face "and" Makin` Whoopee ".